Mar 27th

Online learning could disrupt higher education, but many universities are …

Online learning could disrupt higher education, but many universities are …
News from The Economist:

WHEN MASSIVE OPEN online courses (MOOCs) took off three years ago, there was much concern that they would destroy traditional universities. That isn’t happening. “We’re doing a better job of improving job skills than of transforming the university sector,” says Rick Levin, a former president of Yale, who runs Coursera, the biggest of the MOOCs.

At the margins, technology is making education cheaper, more convenient and more effective. University of the People, a non-profit American-accredited online university, offers degrees to students all over the world at a total cost of $ 4,000; if they are poor, they can get scholarships. It started teaching in 2009, was accredited last year, has produced 65 graduates so far and now has 1,500 students. The faculty is made up of academics who volunteer their services.

The convenience of online study makes it especially suitable for working people. According to Phil Regier, dean of Arizona State University (ASU) Online, the market for online degrees i…………… continues on The Economist

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UGA to offer music education online degree program
News from Bradenton Herald:

— The University of Georgia plans to begin offering a master of music education online degree program.

The university says its Hugh Hodgson School of Music will begin taking applicants immediately for the program that is set to start this summer. It is meant for certified music educators seeking to enhance their practitioner and research skills.

Dale Monson, director of the Hodgson School, says the online program will provide opportunities for those who might otherwise be unable to complete post-graduate studies.

The school says the degree will prepare teachers for professional leadership roles in curriculum design, mentorship and teacher research.

Online:

online.uga.edu/mmed

…………… continues on Bradenton Herald
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Feb 5th

Online education: Higher ed faculty won’t buy in

Online education: Higher ed faculty won’t buy in
News from ZDNet:

Summary:A survey from Babson and Pearson highlights the conundrum that is online distance learning and how disruption will have to wait. A hybrid approach has a shot though.

Online education enrollment was up 3.7 percent in 2014, but that’s the slowest growth rate in 13 years, according to a survey conducted by Babson. Has online education stalled?

The 2014 Survey of Online Learning, conducted by the Babson Survey Research Group and Pearson, details how Internet education programs are seeing slowing enrollment rates, but still outpacing face-to-face programs. Indeed, online and distance learning programs accounted for three quarters of higher education’s enrollment increases.

Babson’s survey, based on 2,800 academic leaders, also highlights a few nuances such as how traditional colleges are starting to catch for-profit institutions in online learning.

Perhaps the biggest takeaway is that online education will be disruptive to the higher education industry—at some point. Consider that 70.8 percent of academic leaders say online programs are critical to their long term strategies, up from 48.8 percent in 2002.

But only 28 pe…………… continues on ZDNet

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The Advent of Online HVAC Education
News from ACHR NEWS:

Mobile devices and field management software are spreading in the HVAC industry. Are you utilizing this technology?

…………… continues on ACHR NEWS
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Jan 23rd

Standardized Online Classes Would Lead Toward Increased Efficency in Higher …

Standardized Online Classes Would Lead Toward Increased Efficency in Higher …
News from Forbes:

Colleges and universities are offering more and more online classes to their students. Textbook companies like Pearson PLC are beginning to standardize these classes by designing online courses and selling them to different universities. These courses, with less labor from professors, promise a more efficient delivery of content to the student and therefore represent a threat to professors, especially adjuncts. After all, what is the point of having instructors in the classroom if a computer can teach everything? But there’s no reason to think that these classes will completely replace instructors. While some adjunct professors will lose their jobs, instructors will still be necessary. Thanks to the increases in productivity from the standardized online course, they will be able to teach more with less labor, and the improved efficiency of teaching can greatly benefit the students.

It’s important to note that most professors will be relatively unaffected by the standardization: many classes can’t be standardized or even taught online. Humanities courses and upper-level courses (regardless of subject) simply can’t be prepackaged,…………… continues on Forbes

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Ohio State ranks in top 10 for distance learning education
News from OSU – The Lantern:

Ohio State currently offers 10 online programs, with more than 270 online courses, and had 2014 enrollment of more than 5,000 students Credit: Courtesy of MCT

Ohio State is striving to bring the academic experience of sitting in a lecture hall to the digital classrooms of its online courses, and its placement among some of the top 10 online programs shows evidence of progress.

U.S. News & World Report recently released its 2015 “Best Online Bachelor’s Programs” report, ranking OSU tied for eighth.

OSU currently offers 10 online programs, with more than 270 online courses, and had 2014 enrollment of more than 5,000 students, Office of the Chief Information Officer spokeswoman Katharine Keune said in an email.

Rob Griffiths, senior director of digital scholarship for ODEE, said OSU’s online program is successful because it offers online students similar content to what is taught in on-campus courses, but presents it using…………… continues on OSU – The Lantern

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Dec 14th

Khan Academy founder has two big ideas for overhauling higher education in …

Khan Academy founder has two big ideas for overhauling higher education in …
News from VentureBeat:

Soft-spoken education revolutionary Sal Khan has a few ideas for how to radically overhaul higher education. First, create a universal degree that’s comparable to a Stanford degree, and second, transform the college transcript into a portfolio of things that students have actually created.

Khan is the founder, executive director, and faculty member at the Khan Academy, an online education provider.

Speaking at the Atlantic’s Navigate tech conference, Khan said that the online education providers and independent technology “boot camp” schools will end up playing an important role in pressuring legacy universities to change their outdated ways.

“I feel like society is ripe for challenging the model of school” he told The Atlantic’s editor, James Bennett, earlier this week.

Credentialing

“The credentialing piece is somewhat broken now,” Khan said. “A very small fraction of the population has the opportunity to attend a university that is broadly known.”

To that end, Khan said that he is working on a universal credentialing system that could compare…………… continues on VentureBeat

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Gov. Inslee to announce education plans in online town hall
News from KHQ Right Now:

Gov. Inslee will announce details of his education plan Monday.

OLYMPIA, Wash. –

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee is hosting a statewide online town hall meeting Monday to talk details of his education plan.

Gov. Inslee’s plan wants to make significant investments in public school funding and reducing early-grade class sizes. It will also include investments in early learning, higher education and efforts to increase graduation rates.

Four schools including Spokane’s Rogers High School will host the online conversation. Other schools participating are Newport High School in Bellevue, Columbia Basin Technical Skills Center in Moses Lake and Jason Lee Middle School in Tacoma.

The town hall will also include a moderated Q&A with educators, parents and students

…………… continues on KHQ Right Now
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Online Education For Dummies
From admission to graduation-your personal guide to studying online Online Education For Dummies explains the ins and outs of att…

MOOC U: Who Is Getting the Most Out of Online Education and Why
MOOC U. explainswhy you should sign up for massive open online course (MOOC) and howyou can get the greatest benefit from the c…

Dec 3rd

The Adaptive Advantage: How E-Learning Will Change Higher Ed

The Adaptive Advantage: How E-Learning Will Change Higher Ed
News from Forbes:

Higher education has seen a proliferation of new models in response to growing market demands. For-profit universities, massive open online courses, and competency-based pedagogies have all vied for a piece of the pie. Adaptive learning – a personalized, technology- and data-driven approach which responds and adapts to both teachers and learners – could provide the answer, and Smart Sparrow, an Australia-based adaptive “eLearning” platform, is leading the way.

Smart Sparrow enables institutions and academics to author unique and adaptive tutorials within existing coursework. Led by founder and CEO Dror Ben-Naim, the platform focuses on supporting teachers by advancing and accelerating student learning.

As each student possesses different levels of knowledge, course content adapts to student responses and creates “adaptive pathways” for students to follow. More advanced learners can skip through content while those less knowledgeable can be directed to additional resources to help them better understand cour…………… continues on Forbes

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Penn-Harris-Madison schools finalizing eLearning snow day plan
News from WSBT-TV:

ST. JOSEPH COUNTY –

If this winter is anything like the last, Penn-Harris-Madison students should gear up for more online classes this year.

Instead of having snow days off, students will still have lessons and homework. They’ll be using the state department of education’s eLearning program to do their assignments online.

PHM tested the program last year, during a harsh winter that forced the corporation to cancel nine school days.

After trying it out, PHM put a survey on its website asking parents for feedback. About 1,200 parents responded, two-thirds of whom were in favor of using eLearning again, says Dr. Kay Antonelli, assistant superintendent of instruction.

This year is different; instead of assigning online work to make up the snow days, this year, eLearning will be available the day school is cancelled.

There is one built-in snow day in the school calendar: Friday, March 20.

Then, there are three days of eLearning curriculum prepared for students.

If the corporation has to take more snow days after that, it’ll survey parents again as to what they think should be done.

The Hoffmans, parents of a third and fourth grader, remember using eLearning last year.

And it’s not a fond memory.

“Our house, we have one computer, two kids,” says Ashle…………… continues on WSBT-TV

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Jun 24th

Charlie Baker’s plan to reduce higher education costs would emphasize online …

Charlie Baker’s plan to reduce higher education costs would emphasize online …
News from MassLive.com:

Charlie Baker, ap 2014

Charlie Baker is pictured at the Massachusetts Republican state convention in Boston, Saturday, March 22, 2014. (Stephan Savoia/AP)

If elected governor, Republican Charles Baker would pursue more online learning, three-year degrees and expanded co-op programs as part of a plan to reduce higher education costs and expand student opportunities.

Baker announced his plan Monday, saying Massachusetts would see jobs continue to migrate out of state unless it makes higher education more affordable and does a better job connecting the public higher education system to the needs of employers. Baker said he would enable more students to earn college credits while in high school and to combine year-round classes with online courses in a bid to “shrink both the time and expense of a college degree.”

Baker supports establishing a competitive grant program for public colleges and high schools to establish or expand co-op programs under which students earn academic credits through courses and work experiences with local employers. And touting cost savings of at least 25 percent, Baker said he would direct the state Board of Higher Education to establish a competitive grant process aimed at facilitating a three-year bachelor’s degree program at existing public colleges or through new institutions b…………… continues on MassLive.com

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Online education on course for rapid growth
News from The Australian:

ONLINE education is tipped to consolidate its place as a growth industry this year, as take-up by sandstone universities increases its public palatability.

A new report by industry researchers IBISWorld lists the sector as the country’s sixth fastest growing employer, behind oil and gas extraction, online shopping, preschool education, mining support and aged accommodation.

…………… continues on The Australian
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May 15th

Where Do MOOCs Fit in Higher Education?

Where Do MOOCs Fit in Higher Education?
News from U.S. News & World Report:

University faculty members from across the country continued an attack on massive open online courses with a video and group of letters sent to three leading online education providers, claiming the companies overpromise and underdeliver when it comes to the types of students they claim to serve.

The Campaign for the Future of Higher Education last week sent letters to the leaders of Coursera, Udacity and edX saying the claims the companies made about online higher education are “overblown, misleading, or simply false.” In an accompanying video released Tuesday, the coalition of faculty leaders questions whether online education providers are adequately serving student populations they have claimed to help in the past, such as those in rural communities and underdeveloped countries.

“Let us be clear: we appreciate the role that technology can play in improving the education of our students. In fact, as college educators, we all use educational technology every day; and many of us have created online learning tools for our students,” the letters read. “We value these tools, and we want them to be used judiciously in our teaching. But these tools are simply not the panacea you claim them t…………… continues on U.S. News & World Report

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Student success lags in community college online courses
News from Central Valley Business Times:

Student success lags in community college online courses

SAN FRANCISCO
May 14, 2014 9:00pm

•  California’s community colleges offer more online classes for credit than any public system in U.S.

•  “But online learning is still an important tool that some are successfully using”

Online course enrollment in California’s community college system (CCC) has grown remarkably in the last 10 years, with nearly 20 percent of the students who took courses for credit taking at least one online in 2012.

However, students are less likely to complete an online course than a traditional course, and they are less likely to complete an online course with a passing grade, according to findings of a report released Wednesday night by the Public Policy Institute of California. It is based on longitudinal student and course level data from all 112 community colleges.

Online course enrollment at CCC — the nation’s largest postsecondary system — has increased by almost 1 million since 2002. Today the colleges offer more online courses for credit than any other public higher education institution in the nation. Online participation has increased among each of the state’s largest ethnic groups, although participation is uneven across groups. It is much lower fo…………… continues on Central Valley Business Times

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Higher Education in the Digital Age
Two of the most visible and important trends in higher education today are its exploding costs and the rapid expansion of online l…

Teach Online: Develop Your First Online Course
Teach Online: Develop Your First Online Course is a step-by-step guide for creating the instructional materials you need for your …

Apr 5th

Senate panel looks at rising cost of higher education

Senate panel looks at rising cost of higher education
News from Rutland Herald:

Senate panel looks at rising cost of higher education

By JOSH O’GORMAN
VERMONT PRESS BUREAU | April 05,2014

MONTPELIER — A Senate bill to study the financial impact of increasing support for state colleges is getting a positive look from a committee in the House of Representatives.

Senate Bill 91, which was passed during the 2013 legislative session, calls for a study of the financial ramifications of increasing public support for institutions in the state college system, as well as what is driving rising education costs in the first place.

The bill is in the House Committee on Education, where Chairwoman Rep. Johannah Leddy Donovan, a Democrat from Burlington, expressed tentative support for the proposal.

“I think it’s a really important issue. I’m inclined, I think if my committee is, to go forward,” Donovan said. “I think there is probably little hope that we’re ever going to be able to turn the clock back on expenses and tuitions for college-bound kids, but I think we owe them at least some sort of analysis of what’s driving the cost and perhaps what we can do to go forward to address those.”

By “turn back the clock,” Donovan was referring to a proposal in the bill to study the financial impact of providing the same level of support for st…………… continues on Rutland Herald

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Viewpoints: Don’t let online education widen the digital divide
News from Sacramento Bee:

As a growing number of households gain access to the Web, bridging the digital divide, Gov. Jerry Brown has rightfully seen online education as a key strategy for delivering higher education opportunities to more students without the added costs, particularly in a state still struggling with debt.

There is also great need to proceed cautiously, however, lest we risk creating a reverse digital divide, in which low-income students, forced into online degree programs as the only affordable option, receive an education that lacks the immeasurable benefits of studying on a bricks-and-mortar campus.

The digital divide that President Barack Obama spoke of in his last State of the Union speech, reiterating his commitment to ensuring that 99 percent of America’s youths gain access to high-speed broadband, is still very real. Compared to more affluent peers, children from lower income families have less access to high-speed Internet service; their connectivity is more likely to occur through cellphones, for example, than computers. This is a worthwhile goal – access to computers and the Internet certainly leads to better learning outcomes.

That access is more important than ever as online learning comes into its own. Colleges and universities around the world are converting traditional courses to online formats. Some elite institutions such…………… continues on Sacramento Bee

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Apr 4th

Higher education Is college worth it?

Higher education Is college worth it?
News from The Economist:

WHEN LaTisha Styles graduated from Kennesaw State University in Georgia in 2006 she had $ 35,000 of student debt. This obligation would have been easy to discharge if her Spanish degree had helped her land a well-paid job. But there is no shortage of Spanish-speakers in a nation that borders Latin America. So Ms Styles found herself working in a clothes shop and a fast-food restaurant for no more than $ 11 an hour.

Frustrated, she took the gutsy decision to go back to the same college and study something more pragmatic. She majored in finance, and now has a good job at an investment consulting firm. Her debt has swollen to $ 65,000, but she will have little trouble paying it off.

As Ms Styles’s story shows, there is no simple answer to the question “Is college worth it?” Some degrees pay for themselves; others don’t. American schoolkids pondering whether to take on huge student loans are constantly told that college is the gateway to the middle class. The truth is more nuanced, as Barack Obama hinted when he said in January that “folks can make a lot more” by learning a trade “than they might with an art history degree”. An angry art history professor forced him to apologise, but he was right.

College graduates aged 25 to 32 who are working full time earn about $ 17,500 more annually than their peers who have only a high school diploma, acco…………… continues on The Economist

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Teach Online: Develop Your First Online Course
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Feb 28th

Louisiana bill would require higher education boards to broadcast meetings online

Louisiana bill would require higher education boards to broadcast meetings online
News from The Times-Picayune:

A Louisiana lawmaker is looking to have all higher education institution meetings held in Baton Rouge be broadcast live over the Internet.

The bill, sponsored by State Sen. Sherri Smith Buffington, calls for LSU, Southern University, University of Louisiana and the Louisiana Community and Technical College systems to broadcast regular and committee meetings via the Internet.

The current law authorizes any public body to live broadcast any meeting, but doesn’t require a board to do so.

Oftentimes, higher education boards will live broadcast meetings when board members think agenda items have widespread interest.

Buffington says the Louisiana Board of Regents, who oversees the state’s higher education institutions, are required to broadcast their meetings online, it’ll be a good idea for other boards that meet in Baton Rouge to do the same.

The Shreveport Republican says there are people who live far around from the state’s capital that would like to know what’s going on with university systems that meet monthly in Baton rouge.

…………… continues on The Times-Picayune
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Meet the Israeli leading the online education revolution
News from Haaretz:

It was a significant week for University of the People. The university — founded by Israeli entrepreneur Shai Reshef in 2009 as a new, low-cost model of higher education — reached an important milestone, gaining U.S. accreditation as an academic institution. The university’s aspires to make higher education accessible to all, as opposed to being an option primarily for people of means.

Many have already deemed University of the People, or UoPeople for short, an educational revolution. This week’s decision makes the degrees it bestows legitimate academic credentials and recognizes graduates as having completed university studies. The graduates — many of them refugees, illegal migrants and poor people, who were generally unable to find adapt themselves to traditional university studies for reasons both financial and personal — now have degrees they never dreamed of.

“I always knew they would recognize us,” says Reshef. “For years, day after day, we had heated arguments on our Facebook page about the recognition issue. ‘Will you get recognized?’ and ‘When will they recognize you?’ We couldn’t answer for legal reasons, and it was frustrating, because we wanted to calm our students down, and tell them that recognition will come, it will happen.”

Reshef, 58, from the city of Petah Tikvah near Tel Aviv, started University of the People four years after se…………… continues on Haaretz

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